WORLD-GEN June/July 2018

WORLD-GEN June/July 2018

WORLD-GENERATION JUNE/JULY 2018 16 PERSPECTIVE energy savings, only 20 percent of respon- dents have automated home functions, such as smart thermostats. In fact, amid growing reports of hacked home devices, 21 percent of respondents cited privacy and security concerns as a barrier to upgrading their thermostats, compared to 15 percent last year. In addition, penetration of smart ther- mostats and automation systems remains very low with only 4 percent using a home automation system and just 8 percent utiliz- ing a programmable thermostat.  A majority of both businesses and resi- dential consumers want environmentally responsible, reliable assets, preferably close by, that they can control to optimize reliabil- ity, flexibility and cost. However, this year’s survey seems to emphasize that privacy and security concerns should be addressed by providers soon to maintain the momen- tum for a clean secure energy future.  “Utilities are being challenged to get to know their customers better, and the indus- try has a long way to go,” said Andrew Slaughter, executive director, Deloitte Center for Energy Solutions, Deloitte Services LP. “What appears clear is that the electric utility sector’s transformation will likely be one of decentralization, digitaliza- tion, and decarbonization driven by busi- ness and residential consumer demand for a cleaner, more resilient, secure and afford- able energy supply.”  ABOUT DELOITTE Deloitte provides industry-leading audit, consulting, tax and advisory services to many of the world’s most admired brands, including more than 85 percent of the Fortune 500 and more than 6,000 pri- vate and middle market companies. Our people work across more than 19 industry sectors to make an impact that matters — delivering measurable and lasting results that help reinforce public trust in our capi- tal markets, inspire clients to see challeng- es as opportunities to transform and thrive, and help lead the way toward a stronger economy and a healthy society. DELOITTE SURVEYS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14 CALIFORNIA’S ELECTRICITY IN MARKETTRANSITION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 Due in part from that local pressure and in part to a decision by the California Independent System Operator saying that local power needs could be met by alterna- tive sources and new transmission, the CEC committee overseeing the certifica- tion recommended denial of the project. The permitting process has since been sus- pended. Subsequently, SCE was asked by the CPUC to move forward with long term pro- curement and resiliency planning for the Santa Barbara/Goleta area encompassed by the Moorpark sub-area. It released its RFP on February 28 for preferred resources (as identified above) and energy storage. It had already signed a contract in 2016 for 10 MW of energy stor- age in Goleta. Its application describing its chosen bids is expected to be submitted to the CPUC for approval in the first quarter of 2019. At the request of the CEC early in 2017, prompted by a demand of an interve- nor, the California ISO produced an analy- sis of what preferred resources and energy storage and reactive power devices would be necessary to meet local capacity requirements in the Moorpark sub-area. SCE designed its RFP around those requirements. Cal ISO also identified two distribution lines in the area, that run through rugged, mountainous terrain as critical – if they are lost due to storms or fire voltage collapse would result. They are the only transmission lines that connect Goleta’s substation with the rest of SCE’s transmission system. Approximately 85,000 customers depend on this transmission system. SCE proposed building another kV line between Moorpark in the southern end of this sub-area and a substation further east near a main transmission line. That line would meet a 232 MW contin- gency, leaving the overall procurement need for 76 MW. As we reach the halfway point of 2018, we want to share some important updates on the evolving market for solar photovolta- ic (PV) panels, along with how Trina Solar is positioning itself for success within this changing landscape. In last week’s AD/ CVD announcement, Trina was given the lowest AD/CVD rate amongst all partici- pants, we’re globally launching new and exciting products like TrinaPro, and we’re expediting the re-launch of the next phase of Trina thru an IPO on the Shanghai Stock Exchange. Trina will continue to be your source for the highest quality products and services in the US via our US team with an un-interrupted 10+ year presence in the US market. OUR CONTINUED COMMITMENTTOTHE U.S. MARKET In recent months, US tariffs on solar modules under Section 201, Chinese FIT program reductions combined with various international tariff trade spats have caused significant disruption to the international trade of solar PV panels. These shifts have affected panel price and market demand, forcing suppliers to recalibrate their strate- gies and focus on markets offering sustain- able opportunities. Trina Solar remains committed to the U.S. market despite the ongoing regulatory changes (AD/CVD, Section 201 and Section 301 investigations). Last week’s final ruling on the 4th review period (covering goods imported in 2016) of the Department of Commerce (“DOC”) anti-dumping/counter- vailing duties (AD/CVD) investigation sig- nificantly reduced the DOC preliminary combined rate of 72% to a more accurate 27% combined rate in line with Trina’s his- torical annual results (23.75%; 30.61%; and 25.14% ). Other Chinese manufacturers have similar percentage rates. Trina’s con- sistent performance in obtaining similar results since the DOC case began in 2012 emphasizes the stability and predictability of Trina Solar’s operational and financial performance in the US market. BACK ON CAMPUS BY JINGTIAN,CLASS OF 2018

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